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Local News

  • Taking the journey with Kali

    This week the Progressive Journal publishes the second chapter of “Kali: A Polar Bear’s Tale,” written by one of her caretakers, Carolyn Mueller.

    We’re one of many U.S. newspapers that are publishing Kali’s – pronounced Cully’s –tale as a way to encourage young children to read and to learn more about newspapers. 

    In today’s fast-paced world, we want to instantly jump from beginning to end, not spending much time in the middle. 

  • Wind chill advisory for Chesterfield County

    The National Weather Service has issued a wind chill advisory for Chesterfield County from 3 a.m. to 9 a.m. Friday.

    Temperatures could go as low as 5 degrees, according to the National Weather Service.

    The low temperature means that there is a chance people could get frost bite or hypothermia. The weather service said people going outside should wear gloves and a hat.

    The advisory covers Chesterfield, Clarendon, Lee and Sumter counties.

     

  • Chesterfield County Schools closed Wednesday

    Chesterfield County schools will be closed Wednesday, school officials said Tuesday afternoon, because of the threat of bad weather. All after school and extracurricular activities are canceled to.

  • Third earthquake of the year for Pageland

    A 2.2 magnitude earthquake was reported Wednesday morning about 6.2 miles west-northwest of Pageland off John Doster Road, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

    The quake was about 1.5 miles below the earth's surface.

    It is the third earthquake recorded near Pageland this year.

    On May 18 there was a 2.2 magnitude earthquake. On Nov. 24 there was a 2.4 magnitude earthquake south, south-west of town.

  • Assigned to shop

    Progressive Journal coworkers Melinda Caldwell Cato and Vanessa Brewer-Tyson have much in common. 

    Pageland is their home. They are graduates of Pageland High School. Vanessa graduated in 1973, Melinda in 1974. 

    They share a love of the outdoors and animals. Melinda says she grew up a tom girl. Vanessa’s childhood home was near farmland, a chicken coop and a pig sty. 

  • NETC introduces 3-Week Online Wintermester

    From release 

    Northeastern Technical College students can accelerate their college education with the new three-week Wintermester from Dec. 11 to Dec. 28. 

    Current NETC students, high school students, and students enrolled in other colleges and universities can enroll in Wintermester. The classes are all online and transferrable to four-year colleges and universities. 

  • Pageland ends water restrictions

    Pageland ended its water restrictions Wednesday morning.

  • Friday morning fire a 'hate crime,' claim property owners

    The fiery destruction of a Pageland building Friday is a hate crime, allege the owners.

    The 2 a.m. fire destroyed a building in the backyard of 808 W. McGregor St.

    Property owners Tim and Neil Griffin say their openly gay lifestyle is the reason for the fire. The two said they have been a couple for about 15 years and married for three.

    The S.C. Law Enforcement Division is investigating the fire. Pageland Police Chief Craig Greenlee requested SLED because the fire was suspicious.

    No cause or estimated damage has been released.

  • Shouting tirade interrupts Pageland Town Council meeting

    A one-person shouting tirade at Tuesday’s Pageland Town Council meeting was part of a longstanding dispute between town council member Elaine Robertson and Tim and Neil Griffin.
    Neil Griffin shouted at the council members, calling them “hypocrites” for their failure to listen to residents’ complaints against Robertson. “This is not a forum for anyone to be critical of the city,” he shouted just before leaving the council chambers.

  • Eastern equine encephalitis case reported in Chesterfield County

    A case of eastern equine encephalitis in a horse has been reported in the Hunts Mills area of Chesterfield County.

    No case of human infection has been reported and eastern equine encephalitis is rare in humans, according to the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control.

    In the United States there are approximately five to 10 cases of eastern equine encephalitis annually, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The disease causes inflammation of the brain and can be fatal.