.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Education

  • 13 graduate from Nursing Assistant program

    From release

    Thirteen students recently graduated Northeastern Technical College’s Nursing Assistant (NA) Program
    Nursing assistant graduates are Alice Gibson of McColl, Tara Harrington of Wallace, Angela Hill of Cheraw, Kristen Honeycutt of Ruby, Courtney Jackson of Bennettsville, Shonda Little of Cheraw, Britney Lowery of Clio, Mary McDowell of McColl, Billie Morton of Chesterfield, Victoria Scott of McColl, Alexus Stubbs of McColl, Lamarte Townsend of Cheraw, and Kerria Wilson of Jefferson.

  • NETC offers 3-Week Wintermester online

    From release

    Northeastern Technical College’s three-Week Wintermester is Dec. 17 to Jan. 4.
    Current NETC students, high school students, and transient students (students enrolled in other colleges and universities) are eligible to enroll in Wintermester.
    The classes are online and transferrable to four-year colleges and universities.

  • 12 graduate NETC’s nursing assistant program

    From release

    Twelve students recently graduated from Northeastern Technical College’s nursing assistant program: Michelle Boswell of Society Hill, Charlee Brown of Bennettsville, Tabitha Carnes of Mount Croghan, Tori Gainey of Hartsville, Veronica Grant of Society Hill, Sharmaneka Hinkle of Bennettsville, Sheba Malachi of Cheraw, Melissa McLain of Cheraw, Elizabeth Melton of Cheraw, Janet Mullis of Pageland, Amanda Strickland of Cheraw, and Fatimah Turnage of Cheraw.

  • NETC honors the Class of 2018

    Northeastern Technical College recently held its 48th annual commencement at the Cheraw High School auditorium. Dr. Kyle Wagner, the college president, delivered the welcome address. State Sen. Kent Williams, who represents Florence, Dillon, Marion, Marlboro, and Horry County, gave the keynote speech.

  • NETC graduates largest nursing class

    From release

    Northeastern Technical College recently graduated its tenth and largest associate degree in nursing class.
    Twenty-seven nursing students receiving their pins at a ceremony in Cheraw.

  • Central graduates 132

    Before the Class of 2018 took its first steps into a new chapter, its members paused Saturday to remember their special moments at Central High School.
    Valedictorian Makayla Kirkley and Salutatorian Jacobson “Jake” Savage recalled those moments, from football Fridays to the homecoming parade to the proms. They even mentioned a few “inside jokes” that had their classmates laughing and left their parents wondering.

  • South Pointe graduates told to walk with God

    South Pointe Christian School’s nine graduating seniors left with more than diploma from the May 25 commencement ceremony.
    They left with charge to walk with the Lord and serve him while you can.
    The charge came from South Point Fellowship interim pastor Marty Quick.
    Quick told parents, relatives and teachers, “It’s our responsibility to give them the word of God.”
    Quicks told the soon-to-be graduates, “God gives us a charge and gives you a warning. Pursue the Lord, and serve him while you can.”

  • Retirement can’t keep teacher from classroom

    In retirement, Brenda Hubbard continues to do what she did for her entire career, mentor students.
    Hubbard once taught students internationally.
    Now she mentors students at Petersburg Primary and Pageland Elementary, sharing artifacts she collected while traveling around the world.
    “There’s no place I would rather be,” Hubbard said of Pageland.  “It doesn’t have anything to do with the size of the place.  It’s the people and the resources.”

  • New Heights students win at Future City

    From release

    Five teams of students from New Heights Middle School recently competed in the state regional Future City Competition, winning three awards. 
    Future City is project-based learning program, sponsored by DiscoverE. Students in 6th, 7th, and 8th grades imagine, research, design, and build cities of the future.
    This year’s theme was “The Resilient City.” Students were asked to design and build a city with resilient infrastructures, especially a power grid, which could overcome a natural disaster.

  • Amendments fine tune Education bill

    The K-12 subcommittee of the House Education committee made 28 changes to a comprehensive education bill before sending it to the full House for consideration last week. 
    The changes were made last Thursday after Gov. Henry McMaster, state Superintendent of Education Molly Spearman, Senate Education Committee chair Greg Hembree, R-Horry and Jay Lucas, speaker of the House, gathered, promising to continue to listen to suggestions on how to improve the bill.
    Some teachers have complained they were not part of the process that drafted the bill.