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Education

  • 8 graduate from NETC’s Nursing Assistant program

    From release

    Eight students recently graduated from Northeastern Technical College’s Nursing Assistant Program.
    The graduates are Rita Blackwell of Cheraw, Tomika Leach of Cheraw, Shakari Marshall of Cheraw, Sherry McDowell of Bennettsville, Tyesha Parker of Bennettsville, Daniel Smith of Cheraw, Angelica Strickland of Bennettsville, and Jessica Wilson of Chesterfield.

  • Central seniors announce plans

    Forty-eight Central High School students took their first step toward higher education on Friday – publically announcing not where they wanted to go, but what they intend to study or do next year.
    The announcements came before family, friends and fellow students at the school’s annual  “College Decision Day.”
    The students signed a certificate of their intentions.
    The ceremony is modeled on the celebrations that happen when high school athletes sign a college scholarship.

  • NETC offering scholarships for short-term studies

    From release

    As the Class of 2018 prepares to graduate, Northeastern Technical College is launching a new program for graduates who haven’t yet made plans for education or career training beyond high school.
    Northeastern Technical College will award 60 scholarships to graduating seniors in Chesterfield County who are interested in short-term workforce certification.

  • Middle school students explore NETC

    CHERAW – The class of 2020 got its first glimpse of what college could be like last week.
    Approximately 600 eighth-graders from Chesterfield, Marlboro and Dillon counties attended Northeastern Technical College’s first Middle School Explorers event March 29.
    Students came from New Heights Middle, Long Middle, Wallace, Chesterfield-Ruby Middle, Blenheim, Latta, Marlboro School of Discovery and McBee Elementary.

  • It’s all in for Central’s Francis

    There is no place to hide in Sophia Francis’ classes at Central High School.
    Her probing, compassionate eyes are always scanning her students.
    She focuses on facial expressions. Do her students understand the algebra, geometry and statistical concepts she is teaching? Or are there confused, even blank looks?
    Even the slightest hint of misunderstanding results in one-on-one help, she says.

  • Lessons from Susan Smith Martin

    National Women’s History Month is observed during March, highlighting the contributions of women in various fields, such as science, sports, entertainment, medicine, technology and education.
    Susan Smith Martin’s difference-making contribution was paving the way for other aspiring teachers.
    In her 25 years of teaching elementary children in Pageland, Martin allowed many teacher cadets, as well as college students, to come into her classroom and observe her teaching strategies.

  • We’re off to see the wizard!

    By KIM MANGUM
    For the Progressive Journal

    Students and parents at New Heights Middle School recently were off to see the wizard. It was a fun-filled magical journey.
    “It was hard work in the beginning but we also had so much fun. We became a Wizard of Oz family,” said seventh-grader Madison Champagne, who played Dorothy. “I’m really sad it’s over!”
    Teachers Kristen Kingen, Lindsey Arant and Shemeika Massey directed the production. Chad Johnson conducted the New Heights chorus.

  • Central juniors receive rings

    By Kim Mangum
    For the Progressive Journal

    Members of the Central High Class of 2019 recently received their school rings.

  • Petersburg Primary hosts African-American Read In
  • No boundaries to success for Leaird

    There are two phrases Jane Leaird will not allow in her Pageland Elementary School classroom:
    “I can’t” and “That’s too hard.”
    She won’t accept her students placing limits on themselves. Her classroom is a place where even the smallest of successes are celebrated daily.
    With 10 students, she has one of the smaller classes at Pageland Elementary. There are times some of her students can work together, but most of the time, Leaird is juggling the individual needs of her students. Each of them learns differently.