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Education

  • Retirement can’t keep teacher from classroom

    In retirement, Brenda Hubbard continues to do what she did for her entire career, mentor students.
    Hubbard once taught students internationally.
    Now she mentors students at Petersburg Primary and Pageland Elementary, sharing artifacts she collected while traveling around the world.
    “There’s no place I would rather be,” Hubbard said of Pageland.  “It doesn’t have anything to do with the size of the place.  It’s the people and the resources.”

  • New Heights students win at Future City

    From release

    Five teams of students from New Heights Middle School recently competed in the state regional Future City Competition, winning three awards. 
    Future City is project-based learning program, sponsored by DiscoverE. Students in 6th, 7th, and 8th grades imagine, research, design, and build cities of the future.
    This year’s theme was “The Resilient City.” Students were asked to design and build a city with resilient infrastructures, especially a power grid, which could overcome a natural disaster.

  • Amendments fine tune Education bill

    The K-12 subcommittee of the House Education committee made 28 changes to a comprehensive education bill before sending it to the full House for consideration last week. 
    The changes were made last Thursday after Gov. Henry McMaster, state Superintendent of Education Molly Spearman, Senate Education Committee chair Greg Hembree, R-Horry and Jay Lucas, speaker of the House, gathered, promising to continue to listen to suggestions on how to improve the bill.
    Some teachers have complained they were not part of the process that drafted the bill.

  • Yow: Education bill needs more changes

    The comprehensive education bill making its way through the S.C. House has provision that could hurt technical colleges and adult education programs, says Rep. Richie Yow, R-Chesterfield County.
    Most of the debate over the bill has focused on kindergarten through high school education, particularly teacher pay, eliminating some tests and how to help failing schools and school districts.

  • Local schools connect students to Black history

    Chesterfield County teachers hope students will “see themselves” in the books and lessons taught during Black History month.
    Ulanda James, the literacy coach at Petersburg Primary, wants children to appreciate diversity and “to see themselves in the books.
    “They need to see that the same stories applicable to whites are applicable to African Americans,” she said. “We have the same loving relationships with our families and community.”

  • Ruby student letter perfect

    CHESTERFIELD – During last Tuesday’s Chesterfield County schools spelling bee, Dillon Burr sat on the front row and made faces at his brother, Brayden.
    Dillon smiled, he smirked, he rolled his eyes.
    On the inside, Brayden, the best speller from Ruby Elementary, was laughing at his brother’s antics.
    Externally, his legs were shaking.
    But most importantly, Brayden kept composed, seeing the words in his mind, like he was reading a dictionary. His biggest concern was tripping over a letter.

  • Pageland Elementary school report card

    “The best students in the World are learning here” proclaims the banner at the front door of Pageland Elementary School.
    A recent South Carolina school report card suggests otherwise. Pageland Elementary was rated  “unsatisfactory,” meaning the school is not meeting state education standards.
    The reports cards have been controversial statewide and Chesterfield school officials say they do not tell the whole story.

  • Pageland Elementary named ‘priority’ school

    Pageland Elementary and middle school students at McBee High School have been identified as “Priority Schools” by the S.C. Department of Education.
    Priority schools are those that rank in the bottom 10 percent of schools statewide.
    The designation gives the Chesterfield County school system access to consultants, state information and some “technical assistance” funds.

  • Central math team excels

    By GAYLE MILLS
    Special to the Progressive Journal

    Genna Rivers of Central High School won honorable mention for the top individual scorers at the 42nd Annual Pee-Dee Regional High School Mathematics Tournament.
    She is the first Central student to earn that distinction.
    Overall, Central finished third in the Tetrad competition. The Scholars Academy of Horry County was first, followed by Trinity-Byrnes Collegiate School of Darlington. Georgetown High School was fourth.

  • S.C. Report Cards: Five county schools get bad grades

    One-third of Chesterfield County schools received below average or worse grades on recently released state school report cards.
    Pageland Elementary received the worse report card of county schools, a 31 out of 100 points, or “unsatisfactory.”
    An unsatisfactory rating means Pageland Elementary is not meeting state education standards. It was one of 62 elementary schools statewide receiving an unsatisfactory rating.